Great Smoky Mountains National Park Campgrounds

The park operates nine developed campgrounds. All have bathroom facilities with running water, but no showers or hookups.
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Upper Flats Wilderness camping in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The park operates nine developed campgrounds. Each campground has restrooms with cold running water and flush toilets. Each individual campsite has a fire grate and picnic table. There are no showers or electrical or water hookups in the park. Shower facilities are available in the communities surrounding the national park. Please inquire about the nearest facilities when you check-in at the campground. For RVs, there is an additional dump station at the Sugarlands Visitor Center.

Sites can be reserved at five of the campgrounds (see below for which ones) by visiting recreation.gov or calling (877) 444-6777. The rest are first-come, first-serve.

Need help deciding on a campground? Read Where to Camp in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains Campground Facilities

Campground

Sites

Reservations

RV

Abrams Creek

16

No

12 ft

Balsam Mountain

46

No

30 ft

Big Creek

12

No

No

Cades Cove

159

Yes

35/40 ft
Dump St

Cataloochee

27

Required

31 ft

Cosby

157

Yes

25 ft

Deep Creek

92

No

26 ft

Elkmont

220

Yes

32/35 ft

Smokemont

142

Yes

35/40 ft
Dump St

Approximate Open Dates for Smoky Campgrounds

Weather permitting

Campground

Approx. Dates

Approx. Fee

Abrams Creek

5/27 -10/10

$14

Balsam Mountain

5/27 - 10/10

$14

Big Creek

4/8 - 10/31

$14

Cades Cove

Year-round

$17-$20

Cataloochee

3/25 - 10/31

$20

Cosby

4/8 - 10/31

$14

Deep Creek

4/8 - 10/31

$17

Elkmont

3/11 - 11/28

$17-$23

Smokemont

Year-round

$17-$20

For up-to-date campground dates and fees, visit the National Park Service website, www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/frontcountry-camping.htm.

Abrams Creek Campground (TN)

Open from late May to mid-October. Located just west of Cades Cove, this 16-site campground sits in the woods along Abrams Creek. Maximum RV length is 12 feet.

Balsam Mountain Campground (NC)

Open late May to mid-October. This 46-site campground sits just off the Blue Ridge Parkway at 5,310 feet. Maximum RV length is 30 feet.

Big Creek Campground (TN)

Open early April to late October. Located in the park’s remote northeastern corner, this 12-site campground along the creek is quiet and open to tents only.

Cades Cove Campground (TN)

Open year-round. This popular campground is one of the park’s largest, with 159 sites. Fits trailers up to 35 feet and motor homes up to 40 feet. Reservations accepted.

Cataloochee Campground (NC)

Open late March to late October. Reservations are required at this 27-site campground nestled in the Cataloochee Valley. Fits RVs up to 31 feet, but be aware that the access road is steep and winding. The entrance road to Cataloochee Valley is a winding, gravel road that has some steep drop offs with no guard rails. Horse trailer traffic may be encountered on the road. Because the road is narrow, it may be necessary to stop or back up to allow other vehicles to pass.

Cosby Campground (TN)

Open early April to late October. A large (157 sites) campground located in the lesser-visited northeast part of the park. Maximum RV length is 25 feet. Reservations accepted.

Deep Creek Campground (NC)

Open early April to late October. A 92-site campground sited along lush Deep Creek just outside Bryson City. Fits RVs up to 26 feet.

Elkmont Campground (TN)

Open mid-March to late November. The park’s largest campground (220 sites) is famous for its synchronous fireflies, which blink in unison on June nights. Fits trailers up to 32 feet and motor homes up to 35 feet. Reservations accepted.

Smokemont Campground

Open year-round. This large (142 sites) campground near the Oconaluftee entrance is located on the Bradley Fork River. Fits trailers up to 35 feet and motor homes up to 40 feet. Reservations accepted.

Backcountry Permits

More than 800 miles of trail grant access to the Smokies’ spectacular backcountry. All backpackers must get reservations and permits up to 30 days before the start of their trips by stopping by the Sugarlands Visitor Center in person or visiting smokiespermits.nps.gov. The website also allows you to check campsite and shelter availability and print your permit. For trip-planning help or to ask questions, call the Backcountry Office at (865) 436-1297.

Need a map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park? Buy the National Geographic Trails Illustrated Map for Great Smoky at REI.com. The map includes trails, trailheads, points of interest, campgrounds, geologic history and much more printed on waterproof, tear-resistant material.

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