Bobcats in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Bobcats, thought to be the only felines that live in the park, are solitary, reclusive creatures.
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Bobcat. Photo by Grant Ordelheide

Bobcat. Photo by Grant Ordelheide

Bobcats, thought to be the only felines that live in the park, are solitary, reclusive creatures. Weighing up to 70 pounds, bobcats have spotted coats, stubby tails, and ears with hairy tufts. Their preferred prey is rabbits, but bobcats also hunt rodents and birds. Individual cats establish their own home territories, which can be as large as 30 square miles, and use scents to mark them against intruders. Females give birth to one to six kittens in late winter which remain with their mothers for less than a year.

Where to See Bobcats

You probably won’t. Count yourself lucky if you spot one of these shy, mostly nocturnal cats.

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